November 4, 2011

Come Together

In commemoration of the discovery of the AIDS Virus, 30 years ago, Kenneth Cole has partnered with MTV International's Staying Alive Foundation and amfAR to reinterpret the AIDS ribbon. The ribbon was redesigned with the theme of coming together in mind, with two intersection ribbons; the double loop symbolizes individuals re-doubling efforts to fight against HIV and AIDS.



I have 4 pins I'd like to share with readers; just comment below if you would like one. If you'd like to share a story, an anecdote, a memoriam of an individual who has touched you or personalized the struggle against AIDS for you, please feel free to do so. I don't normally post about issues or campaigns like this, but I feel as though our generation, in some ways, feels untouchable by HIV/AIDS, and as if it's a thing of the past; it's important to remember that both at home and abroad, this is certainly not the case. I don't know a single person who has not, to some capacity, been affected by AIDS or HIV, and I hope you will join in commemorating this time and continuing the fight.


You can purchase the pins here for $5 - 100% of the net profits from the newly redesigned pin will go to supporting MTV Staying Alive Foundation and amfAR. The pins will be available at Kenneth Cole retail and outlet stores in the US, Latin America, Israel, the Phillippines, Kennethcole.com, Bloomingdales, Gilt Groupe, and House of Fraser in the UK.

17 comments:

  1. I never know how I feel about '100% of the profits' - surely these companies are wealthy enough to give a straight out 100%, they don't need to recoup the pennies it costs to make these things.  But still, raising awareness is a good thing in this instance, you are right when you say our generation feels untouchable. 

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  2. What a wonderful idea.  I'd love to be entered for one of the pins.

    http://kathrynscuriouslife.blogspot.com/

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  3. Katrina Valentine TracumaNovember 4, 2011 at 8:41 AM

    You are right, it seems that all have forgotten too soon about these issues. It`s like thinking about war; people tend to not remember, it`s just too hard not to. Wonderful idea-I would love to get one of the pins. Thank you.

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  4. I would love to be in consideration for one of the pins.

    When I was in high school we had a talk from an amazing woman with HIV, she was funny, engaging and really made me think. I had for years before been the one person who would (verbally) beat people down for being homophobic as I knew I was bi at that point. This woman told everyone the point I'd been trying to make to a lot of my friends: This is not just a gay man's disease. It effects everyone, directly or not.

    Sorry for the ramble, I get pretty passionate about this kind of issue. :)

    http://siansfatshionrags.blogspot.com/

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  5. i think this issue often gets over shadowed by other diseases and world problems... even though HIV/AIDS is always in the top 10 of the WHO's causes of death worldwide. we often forget that people live with this every day of their life. we've come a long way in understanding the disease but the stigma is still there. and you're right our generation appears to be blissfully unscathed by this disease because it always categorized as a "third world" problem. it's a WORLD WIDE epidemic and the world needs to be educated. it's campaigns like this that give us that stark reminder - this is not a joke. it is something that we need to be conscious of and continue to raise awareness to help in HIV/AIDS prevention as well as helping everyone have affordable access to medication.

    i would love to support this brilliant, long overdue campaign. thanks for sharing nicolette!

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  6. Oh my has it been 30 years? I remember when the stories about aids hit us! I was a teenager and we only knew that de disease was deadly! If you had aids (we didn’t know the difference between aids and hiv) you were going to die within the year! I also remember that people were telling us that only gay people would get aids and that is was very dangerous to touch gay people! Oh my we weren’t educated properly! As a teacher I taught teenagers about aids and I realized that a lot of them were clueless, even now after more than 20 years a lot of people are still clueless about hiv and aids! You are right about the untouchable part, nowadays people think you don’t die of HIV!!!!! It very important to fight against the perception that it isn’t deadly!

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  7. I would be so grateful and proud to wear one of these ribbons. Not only to spread awareness on campus from people asking questions but to support those who live with HIV/AIDS everyday.
    My fathers cousin was gay, and African American in 1980's Philadelphia. He was diagnosed with AIDS on his 19th birthday because when he gave blood for donation, the needle had traces of blood from another donor who was unaware of their contraction of the HIV virus, and the blood van was not as careful as they should have been. So he contracted HIV, but worst of all his family except my father and his brother and mother completely isolated him, treating like he was something dirty and disgusting because they refused to listen to his story, and that he had not gotten the virus from his partner. His partner left him becaue his family became increasingly spiteful and mean. He died two years later, alone. His family had abandoned him, his partner had, and those in the family who did care deeply for him like my father were not able to get in contact with him during his last year since they were unable to get forwarding information from the family for him. This story was told to me after my sisters best friend had committed suicide in high school because of the teasing and bullying from homophobes. It was the only time in my life my father has ever cried in front of me. He lost a close cousin and my sister had just been dealt the harsh reality card of how cruel people are.

    "There are saving graces and we must not frget the good in life" is what my dad told me afterward. "WE must love everyone because no person is entitled to anything more than another human being. Regardless of color, creed, economics or relational preferences we must perpetuate love for all. Spread it because so many people live without love when they need it most. Be tolerant and understanding even when you don't agree with someones choices or views." Both myself and my sister have volunteered to promote awareness of HIV/AIDS and LGBT understanding. We don't want people to feel like they're alone, because they are not.

    Thanks for sharing this, even when backed by corporations it is something that will hopefully spread the word, and bring more understanding to people.

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  8. Buying one now. Moving- and so rare to see 100% of proceeds donated. Thanks for the awareness. 

    xx- Sabrinahttp://www.samplesize16.com/

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  9. It is important that people realize that HIV/AIDS is still around and to acknowledge that it is a virus/disease that does not discriminate.  I support the HIV/AIDS awareness movement.

    ♥, Kiyomi

    ♥Follow my blog at colormerunway.blogspot.com ♥

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  10. Hi,
    First of all let me start off by saying I really enjoy reading your blog and especially this post! My Uncle Anson (rest in peace) passed away from AIDS in the early 90's and even though I was only a toddler I miss him dearly, all the stories I hear about him from my mom and other family members was that he was a delightful individual! Months before he had passed his partner Lee died from a liver disease. My moms feels his broken heart caused him to grow weaker and eventually got the best of him. I wish he was still alive today........he was an amazing soul that touched the lives of hundreds of people. -Lumnija

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  11. A close friend of mine works tirelessly in our community, Southeast Alaska, as a case manager for the Alaska Aids Assistance Association, she also runs the community's only needle exchange, teaches classes everywhere, working to help people with AIDS and HIV and toward its prevention - whenever an article pops up about studies, experimental drugs, etc, I send them her way, whenever there is a fundraiser or awareness event, I'm there. It's not just in support of this friend, but through her I learned that it affects communities everywhere. If I were to get my hands on one of these, I'd probably give it to her. 

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  12. my best friend loss her mom to HIV/Aids as a child she also was bord with HIV and her dad contracted it from her mom. Her and her dad are such wonderful people living with this disease. They are the reason I fight for cure someday

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  13. Paulina JakubowskaNovember 7, 2011 at 3:35 PM

    Well, I don't really have any story, but I think it's important to show support for different charities, such as this one, to show them you care. And I do care. I'm going to be honest, I would love to one of these pins! I feel really sad thinking about people who have been affected by AIDS or HIV. When I was still attending school, that's like a year ago, during my form time (which was half an hour 'free' time), my tutor has decided to come up with an idea to do with a charity, so that we can spend this time doing something good. No one has really done anything, but my teacher found one charity thing - knit a square. Its purpose was for people to knit a square, so that the charity will sew them all together to make a blanket for children who have lost family because of AIDS or have it themselves in South Africa. I thought it's an amazing idea. Before this I didn't know how to knit but this helped me to learn it. I have knitted 2 squares, while everyone done 1, and then out tutor has sent it to the charity. It felt really good after knowing I might have helped someone live! 
    Sorry for writing loads,Paulina

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  14. Wow! Thank you for sharing. I hope for them that there is a cure someday.

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  15. I've always lived in big cities so I've always been surrounded by a tremendous number of resources for accessible healthcare, I can't even imagine what it's like in small cities and towns. I'd love to send a pin to you. Please email me your address so I can ship one out after the Thanksgiving holiday! nicolettemason@gmail.com

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  16. Thank you so much for sharing your story. I'd love to send you one of these pins. Please email me your address!

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  17. Hi Nicolette,
    I just saw this post so it's probably too late for a pin, but if not - I'd love for you to send me one.  Money is unfortunately very tight.  Both my mother and my stepfather are HIV positive.  My mother has lived with it for 18 years so for our family a cure is, unfortunately, probably not going to happen in her lifetime.  I try to do all I can to raise awareness regardless in all aspects.  I did student outreach after college and made sure to have programs involving non-judgmental HIV/AIDS education.  As an RA in the dorms I was always the one who would hand out unlimited condoms, no questions asked.  Now, I am in a social services field and I still make sure all of these things are available without judgment.  HIV/AIDS is obviously still a huge societal issue and is not going to go away until people stop being apathetic and speak out.  Thank you for posting about this.

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